Friday, May 18, 2018

A World a Week 5/18/18: Egg City

So from pimps and pushers to vampires and messiahs, this urban fantasy setting has been batted around by me for some time. It started out as something called "The Straits." Adding in the Easter Bunny as kind of the incredible Hulk, things went weird. Well, weirder I should say. I will add the map that made it into the PDF/game-zine later.

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Every Time at a Table, May '18



Posting for a Spacers(TM) session to continue the play-testing started an impromptu Hoot weekend. Last Saturday and the next day was three RPG session half-marathon. Jedi, little Tom, and Sarah decided to come up to Cleveland from Springfield and were looking to do some serious tabletop partying. Then the "Frequent Sundays" ICONS campaign with Curtis and Mr Wylie from Oklahoma took place on-line two hours after that other gang left.

I am making notes on each session adding hard parts from the SPACERS(TM) Core rules and adding in the players' touches as they occur. This is mostly to watch a sci-fi campaign grow organically-- I other scenarios and campaigns have been tightly defined but the CLE-216 Frontier is not. With the help of Colin and a couple of unplanned visits from out-of-towners, the Saturday group at the Weird Realms has been the place to do that. I outline a session, re-read the rules while we play, and then type in problems and working parts in the after notes. This session in particular Jedi helped me focus on problems in ship damage system while enjoying Little Tom's technobabble ability while playing a "Fixer" Type. Peryton's Psychic character is helping me expand that aspect of the game as well.

The Saturday role-playing didn't end there. Sarah, on a lark, decided to do a first run of an idea in her head for Crawlspace Deluxe.  Mixing in the actor/producer dynamics into the story line, she took the college kid survival horror drama and mixed in cannibals and folklore. It was fun and we, mostly because of tipsiness and fatigue, dove hard into the All-In Hand mechanics. Jedi started coming up with a 7-card Holden variation which I over-ruled for the session, but may delve into more the deluxe redux edition. I would like to see the "EAT ME!" scenario published over the summer. We'll see what happens there.

Peryton and I were able to shrug off fatigue, sipping whiskey and drinking coffee, respectively, to conclude a story-arc which can only be called "The Chompers Cycle". This ICONS super-pets issue was just wrong and definitely not approved by the Comic Code Authority. More than a few of obscure members of the Scrap Pile, our "Avengers/JLA" super group, were able to make cameos, the GM doing their personalities while their original players watched. It was fun and showed us how rich our superhero campaign world is despite more often than not used for over-drinking with far away friends without the dangers of drunken driving.

So that is how the "off season" is going for gaming. My efforts to reconnect with early ties to local gamers, doing so-so, but what a time for Cleveland being a RPG tourism market.

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

The Obligatory ICONS session write-up, May 8th

Well I started an ICONS mini-series

Not really new. Of Curtis and Peryton, I am the least prolific runners, so I try to make mine special. Part 1 of my Scraps of Magic, "Something Witchy this Way Comes" worked out. The characters of Chance Montgomery (the Occultress, whether her play likes it or not), Counterfeit, and Jay (not just Jay, but Jay Ramirez), are gelling into a quirky group of supernatural protagonists where their arguments with the universe of magic and metaphysics is often more drama than what I provide in my story.

The Occultress
Image may contain: 1 personShe is only called this by pervy would-be boyfriends, that happen to make up 99% of Chance Montgomery's private investigator business's clientele. She is a better detective than your average gumshoe because she is psychic as in seeing the past and glimpses of the future. But she's also really unlucky in love and war. There's more to that last statement than I want to go into right now.

Counterfeit
Image may contain: 1 person, shoesNot saying this is a creature that has been summoned from another world and especially not a minion of a powerful spider demon, but she is. Her illusion ability is only hampered by her bad taste. And then there's Jay[Moda Masculina] Pantalones Verdes: Ăšltima tendencia ...Something of a witch in his own right, he's just nowhere near as good a bruja as his deceased Nanaita. And she keeps telling him this, as she is able to possess him when he wants to cast spells harder than he is capable of. Of course, her walking around in his body has it's drawbacks, which I am going to get more into as our little campaign progressesThe four were hired by Doctor Philosophy, the current keeper of the Townhouse of Terrible, to find out what happened to two of his friends, Professor Prim and Mz. Dames. The two occult scholars were keeping tabs on a group of shady cultists before they disappeared. Our trio not only found the group of witches, collectively known as "the Coven" being lead by gender-confused Natalie Reverend, err Nathan Rev, "the Warlock." They then discovered that the destructive paranormal entity known as The Burning Man had been summoned from his "Morning Star" portal, which usually does not bode well for the place where he is walking around. There was also the the very mercenary anti-hero called Night Ninja, that looked a lot like Marvel comic's Moon Knight, except there was no cape, and he wore gray, so totally different, hanging around.The group did their best to find the missing persons but only ruled out where the two were not. The post-cognition sex scenes were avoided to keep things PG-13. They were able to find out where the Burning Man was going to appear again, right where they and the Coven were. And in a plot twist that worked out really well, it was discovered that the "shady cultists" were actually trying to banish the metaphysical wave of destruction after it had been summoned by Prim and Dames, who were the super-villains Hypnos and Moon-Wolf respectively. Supernatural fisticuffs ensued, with the Magical Scrappers being able to turn the tables on Hypnos and Moon-Wolf. The Coven was able to banish the Burning Man, but at the loss of three of their members and Natalie... err Nathan Rev, their "Warlock." In the explosive departure of the Solomon Grundy aflame, Night Ninja helped the other villains escape.Upon reporting back to Doctor Philosophy, they learned that Night Ninja had been busy elsewhere stealing the Key of Kthom-Kopf as well as helping his fallen friends. It was here where our protagonists decided to become a trio of heroes, especially when the metaphysical master offered to keep them on retainer for the duration of the investigation.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Everytime at a Table, April '18.

In between BASHCon in February and GENCON sometime in July-August has suddenly become a good time for not only working on things clanging around my head but I can connect with nearby tabletop role-players. To date, this year, I am capitalizing on the opportunity. The advent of biweekly Saturday evening role-playing is not only only drawing in fellow gamers, I get to play as well as run things. Combined with my construction efforts, life is full.

Wobbling is a good thing
I am work on the final revision of an RPG game that I have said that never really liked. That said, sitting back and looking at the work that I keep on doing, it works. Add in about nine years of play-testing scenarios,. Then swish around a few illustrations and graphics, Ultimately, you will have a finished product.

I have a couple half-way complete projects that I hope to get out before I die. I'd also like to make sure that my game system makes sense. At the same time, I need folks willing to play with me. Luckily, I have the personal level covered. On the other hand, I am dealing with good GMs that have stories to work out. At the same time, I have a couple of assume GMs. Below is my LOTFP notes from a GM that approved my maps based off of his narrative.



Old School Gaming is Naval Gazing... Leading to cancer.
Okay, I only have 3.16 examples to explain this you, dear innocent reader. So let me try to explain.
I've played exactly 10 sessions of Dungeon Crawl Classics and more than a handful of whatever else claims to be OSR. I have just recently been to Geriatric Con Cheese Curd edition. I have also played in someone's revision of TSR Gangbusters. In all but three situations I have not only dealt with sullen GMs, mostly that Gangbusters guy, not willing to deal with creative players, I have played with petty players. I have dealt with the animosity of  players harboring favor from arbitrary rules that want to define success as scared people turning multiple pages to do something like "118 points" of damage to player-characters that have six points to their vicarious existence. They back bite their fellow players and run away from challenges.

Let's look at this logically. Okay you have systems that encourage statistics to govern the average PC to perform illogical feats in order to become recognized personas in an under-scripted saga. This saga requires your Character to be both the protagonist and the butt-monkey to on-going story in front of it. In about a decade, and 47 of your best efforts to attain 3rd level, you get to be apart of a glorious story. Ayup. That's how it goes. If you're looking at things from 1000 years in the future.

Every role-player is about character advancement and dealing with situations that they don't deal with daily. So what does being a turnip farmer awaiting death at some chance to die in a bit of random goo based solely of  rules lead to? It might fulfill some asshole's desire to be in control of squat. At the same time, both sides of these participants actions lead to seclusion from hope of dealing with anything new.

NOT the "sullen" GM, instead a great one who is just wrong.
 Years-long weekly Open sessions that lead to four 1st-3rd Level, dealing with newcomers like viruses.The most comfortable is hurt even for an evening. The usual  cry "We should screen our players" without knowing the rules. This is while the expected crowd, meaning the "regulars," look like incompetent newcomers. Meanwhile real, just arrived, role-players deal with them. Especially quaint when the strangers understand the rules better than they, the regulars, do after listening to the GM fifteen minutes when they, themselves, asked earlier. If someone has to turn four pages to do 16 points of damage to a Character that has "3" Hit Points,. At that point something is wrong. I don't blame the GMs, they are only promoting a flawed series of products meant to get husbands home to their griping wives earlier than 4am. Old School Gaming is about assholes trying to be 14 years-old forever.
I learned this because a friend from out of town wanted to play with a fabulous DCC group here in Cleveland every Thursday night. We almost killed them all with 0-level characters that none of my group really took seriously.

Alien Sightings beyond Arcturus!

The bright spot of dealing with the "Old School" crowd was that the next night was scheduled for me to GM something. I rolled a d8 to decide among my preferred games. I showcased my Spacers (TM) RPG. Everybody, all five of us, had a great time. It was nice to play for about three and a half hours and tell a story.


Every time at the tabletop is a victory, despite the OSR crowd.

Sunday, April 1, 2018

Every Time at a Table is a Victory

Oddly enough the convention schedule between February until now has been a little full. Between BASHCon and GARYCon, I only had two weeks to get things in order between them. And by get things together, I mean financial concerns. Being at the point where my "art" does not pay any bills except for about every fourth delivered pizza, I rely heavily upon my savings account.

But last Saturday night (March 31st), I was able to get back into gaming at the local area gaming store. Both people that I know and people that I hope to get to know.

Two people I have gamed with for over a year.
I wish we had a picture of everybody playing in the tabletop session, but frankly my wife worked her Character too well and things ended too quickly. It's alright, we were at the 3 1/2 hour mark anyway. 

I am moving beyond just small into the weird press

So like anyways, Egg City.
Egg City is, finally, my response to The Easter Bunny Hates You video that has been available for over a decade now. Take a 70s exploitation flick, work in some RPG urban fantasy, and add some not too subtle analogy. Wallah! This project was supposed to be about ten pages long, and then my urban fantasy project from 2004 (then called "The Straits") got worked into the mix. So about forty pages later, and three illustrations from both Jedi and me (Monkey Lot), an affordable product is now up to the cost of budget lunch at Mickey Gee's and not in the PeryPubber "affordable rage". But hey, if you want the Easter Bunny as your umbering hulk and Jesus as your Horus, and fuzzy animals as humans, then this product is for you.

Let me try to better express things beyond a soundbite. Take whatever edition of Shadowrun that included your favorite campaign and your 16 steampunk games, and get rid D&D altogether. While it does still have elves (who doesn't), the rest of the Gygax canon folk are not mentioned. Instead one has neanderthals, otter-faces, a kindred that I call the "imby" (poor cousins of the NIMBY), and Ken St Andre's (T&T) ratlings. Then work in a world that is only cutting edge when it's the most affluent, and the rest of the world deal with data plans on their phones and feeding horses to get to and from their office jobs downtown five days a week.

Then work in a violent Easter Bunny... . The one that hates you, but Santa Claus likes him and judges you.

Over a year ago, I told Beckett, the owner of our local Weird Realms games and escapists media store, something for Easter to compliment the release of the Santa Lands. Well it has taken a while it is here now though. Mind you, the "print run" is fourteen copies being made at a Staples(r) copy center, and three of them being handed out for free to the play-testers. Still, the PDF sales for holiday related items do pay for the art and photocopies, if not for the four months out of my free time it took to get it out of my head. Still, it is a good thing to finally have this setting off my mind.



Sunday, March 18, 2018

The Death of a Pirate King

As of right now, I am not sure where Peryton found this article but it is about the death of my T&T friend James L. Shipman. Which according to this obituary looked something like this in his prime, at least according to his mother.


His snarling look and spit about to come out his mouth are rather untypical for the man that I chatted with back in the Oughts (99-o8). He was a man that refused to be flustered by the conventions of life around him, as well as in love with his fiance, a medical grad student that teased him relentlessly. The conventions of flustering life around him were apparently those of a smallish, but affluent, batch of fans clamoring for GM-guided adventures of the T&T (Tunnels and Trolls (TM) ) RPG game system. Because of him, I would not only publish "outlaw" adventures that were not solo-adventures for the system, I would go on to get to know the creators, in person, while he demanded his dues.

Perhaps his snarling and spitting visage comes from his frustration at not being able to steal T&T from the first robber-barrons that stole their fame from pre-1st Edition D&D. They organized against him, with my help, when it was found out that he was using people's artwork without accreditation and not paying them. Indeed, I was the one that helped the scandal get some mileage-- he had tried to steal my New Khazan from me. By the way, I knew he was stealing other people's artwork about two years before the party. Anybody paying attention should have already. In his acquiescence, he'd exclude me from his Russian Troll-Factory-like theft of T&T products from others producing anything after his fall from grace. Lest people forget he was not just graced but beloved among the T&T delvers at one time.

In any case, if this is the Shippy that would interrupt my Civilization games with Yahoo messages back in 1999 with request for specifics on "gunnes" from 1577 for Tunnels and Trolls, I'll miss not having him around. Unlike others, I have nothing to blame him for, except being a little too smart compared to his competitors but not having the money to do anything about it.

In a Yahoo Chatroom Verse, somewhere,
My ork Wizard will always ask into the nothing, "Are you there?"
A hobbit thief will always step out of the shadows to answer, "Yes."

Monday, March 12, 2018

Apocalyptic Cheese: Assault on the Gary Conplex 2018

Thursday AM, roughly 10am local time, I found myself facing Chicago traffic for a third time in six months, all to be heading to Wisconsin. This time not for work, but being a tourist-- not just that but an Adventurer! I was driving to Lake Geneva for Gary Con X. Monk had tried to facilitate us two meeting us there six years before, but had to cancel. This year he dug in and with determination he made sure we got there. Of course I had to drive to Milwaukee, first, to pick him up at the airport, which was as far away from the Grand Geneva Resort, the convention's home site for now, as Chicago O'Hara, but who was counting anyway? Actually I was... .

So having left Cleveland at 6am local time, I was close enough to the Gen Mitchel Airport (MKE) at 11:50 to stop off and take a break. I hit the Mars Cheese Castle. Having a couple of beers and a liverwurst sandwich, on which onions and lettuce costed extra(?), I chatted up a Wisconsin-inspired Glow scenario with JerryTel IRC to pass the time. Badgers and cows were involved, and I was allowed to sample the establishment's beer cheese. Finally a little after 4pm I was able to go and pick up my Bru from the airport.
At around 5:15, Monk bothered to ask me, "What time is the game you're running again?"
"Six, tonight." I told him as I had three months earlier.
He looked at the GPS on the windshield which indicated that we would be there at 5:42 pm, and replied, "Oh."
At 5:49pm though, I was checking in at the Registration Desk. The convention had been running all day already, so the lines were mostly empty. The GM's spot didn't have me so without comment, I moved to the Preregistered line, because I couldn't schedule an event without paying for a badge to begin with. There were three people in front of me, and single person working the line. Another fellow moved to an unattended registration line and suddenly four people rushed to that line. The attendant did the one that showed up first, whom he seemed to know, and then announced he was closed. It took a while for the on-rushers to get the point to move behind me. On my turn, at 5:57, the fellow couldn't find "Tom Loney" nor "Thomas...", I told him my user name for the site was "Tom K." He couldn't find that either. I showed him that my event was in the catalog, and suddenly he found my email address, where a "Tom K Loney" had bought a badge for a "Tom K" from Cleveland, OH according to the payment information. A dude nearby wearing a name badge entitled something like "Wulf Rager" smirked. At 6:06pm, I was standing at an empty table, where I waited for fourteen minutes. In a few more minutes, I found Monk also at the registration desk, where his badge couldn't be located either. At 7:07, after checking emails and verifying program entries for events registered, it was discovered by the attendant that "Michael" is indeed the longer form of the name "Mike" and badge was pre-printed and awaiting that person. Upon this warm welcome, finding our room far on the wings of the resort, involved four sets of stairs and two ramps and four buildings. Walking outside avoided this cavern-like voyage. We would be the only two conventioneers to utilize the fresh air route as far as I could tell though. Hey, maybe it's an old school thing, despite all the power scooters.
By around 8pm, I ran into Dan, Frank Sinatra from Rat Pack vs Cthulhu days, and we slipped into the gamed session called "The Transience County War" for a system called Feral World. The GM was the author, a Sydney Wyeth, who brought the furry-humanoids to the old west, complete with recoil rolls and shotgun pellet scatter rules. It was fun, but by midnight we were all dying from exhaustion.The next day, all the morning games I looked into were filled with six people and then some. But around 2pm, I was able to run an unofficial Crawlspace game, "The Sleep Study", the one that no one showed up the night before for Dan and his entourage (his son, Kyle, and buddy, Bryon(sp?)), and Monk. Monk and Dan went on to find a D&D session to play in. I spent the rest of Friday night holding my liquor well until I wasn't. I would like to thank Christine, Joseph, Joe, Niall, and a few others for putting up with me. I came back to the room when I noticed I was slurring really bad. I did catch some serious pod casters talking about a dice-driven golf game and other more mundane RPG sessions before then.
Saturday at least until 4pm, every game that I was interested in was booked up. I did have lunch with Monk and a fellow from Rhode Island, Tim, that was running a DCC Lankhmar scenario. I'd wrap up my endeavors, at 4:45pm, having a cocktail with Josh from Prolific Games. I was invited to a game that evening but I missed a page and ended up just hanging out watching TV. Sunday was ditto and this time Monk hung out as well. Monday was spent checking out and getting Monk to Taco Bell before getting him back to the airport. The drive home was a bit long, and Chicago tolls are excruciating.


This was a great GMs' convention. Every table from Friday am on was booked up. The red banners proclaiming how full a table was were everywhere before the games were even supposed to start and chairs around the table filled. As for special guests, this is the place to be. The program has some fourteen out of 82 pages of personages the attendee should meet. The resort itself is a pleasant smaller complex where the miles around it are hidden by its rolling hills and deep valleys. The staff was great, I am not sure if I didn't meet any wait staff that was not a grad student if not a teacher already getting extra money. The breakfast buffet had great smoked trout and a wonderful omelet chef.

I am just not sure if dedicating myself to the convention is the right thing for me. Monk and I mostly did it as a lark, "a bucket list thingy" as we joked years before. While it is 80% role-players, it was still around 1,200 people, I think, and there are like plenty of OSR games plying for attention. And folks, judging from registration onward, were not the types that like stuff that isn't very familiar to them. While I could register ahead of time to play in games, I doubt my Crawlspace, or other projects, would receive anything beyond marginal attendance for a handful of years. In case you haven't noticed, I am a running GM that is getting no younger.
Wisconsin though was very proud of its cheese.